Kevin Burke AIA, LEED AP

Kevin Burke AIA, LEED AP

Principal

  • State Licensure: WY
, ID, AZ, MT
  • American Institute of Architects (AIA)

  • National Council of Architectural Registrations Boards (NCARB)

  • U.S. Green Building Council, LEED Accredited

Bio

Impressed and inspired by the western landscape since childhood, Kevin’s design approach is respectful, quiet, and honest. It is rooted in simplicity—of materials, structure, and form—but is not simple. Kevin draws from the vernacular, updating it with today’s methods and materials.

A graduate of the School of Architecture at Roger Williams University in Rhode Island, Kevin joined CLB in 1999 and was made a partner in 2006. Today he is managing principal, directing the firm’s finances, business, and staff while inspiring an organized and motivated team. Aside from everyday management duties, Kevin has an affinity for the technical aspects of building in our unique climate and mentors best-practice principles of building science, ensuring high technical standards for all projects. A LEED Accredited Professional by the U.S. Green Building Council, he furthers the firm’s commitment to environmental integrity through innovative green building techniques.

He has managed many large-scale projects including the Jackson Hole Airport Expansion and Renovation, Home Ranch Welcome Center, Questar Office and Industrial Complex, and Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve. Currently he is principal-in-charge for the Center Street Project, a full-service hotel on Jackson’s Town Square, along with several custom residential projects.

In the community, Kevin is on the board of Teton Adaptive Sports. He is on Team Jackson Hole, a non-profitcycling team with the goal of raising awareness for community causes and projects with their primary focus on Old Pass Road. He has spent time as a ski coach and a volunteer for Special Olympics Wyoming. Kevin has cycled around the European Alps, noticing the lessons the architecture there has to teach. “There’s a direct correlation between what people have been building for hundreds of years over there and what has been manifested in mountain architecture here,” he says.